Which Dr Seuss Books Are Pulled From Stores?

Dr. Seuss books are some of the most beloved children’s books of all time. But did you know that some of his books are actually banned? Here’s a list of the Dr. Seuss books that have been pulled from store shelves.

Checkout this video:

Dr. Seuss’s books that have been pulled from stores

Dr. Seuss’s books that have been pulled from stores include “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,” “If I Ran the Zoo,” “McElligot’s Pool,” “On Beyond Zebra!,” “Scrambled Eggs Super!,” and “The Cat’s Quizzer.” These books are being pulled because they contain racist and offensive imagery.

The reason why these books are being pulled

According to a statement from Dr. Seuss Enterprises, “These books portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong.” The decision to pull the books was made “after thoughtful review and consideration” and in consultation with a variety of experts, including educators.

This isn’t the first time Dr. Seuss’s work has been the subject of controversy. In 2017, a school librarian in Cambridge, Massachusetts, rejected a donation of 10 Dr. Seuss books from first lady Melania Trump, saying they “largely forward racist propaganda and caricatures.”

The backlash from fans of Dr. Seuss

Recently, six of Dr. Seuss’s books were pulled from publication due to racist and offensive imagery. The decision was made by the Dr. Seuss Foundation after consulting with a panel of experts, including educators.

The six books are “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,” “If I Ran the Zoo,” “McElligot’s Pool,” “On Beyond Zebra!,” “Scrambled Eggs Super!,” and “The Cat’s Quizzer.”

Fans of Dr. Seuss have expressed their outrage at the decision, with some even calling for a boycott of his books. However, many people believe that the decision was necessary in order to be more inclusive and avoid perpetuating offensive stereotypes.

How this impacts the future of Dr. Seuss’s books

In recent years, Dr. Seuss’s books have come under fire for their alleged racist and sexist content. As a result, certain titles have been pulled from store shelves and are no longer being published. Here is a list of the books that are no longer available:

-And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street
-If I Ran the Zoo
-McElligot’s Pool
-On Beyond Zebra!
-Scrambled Eggs Super!
-The Cat’s Quizzer
-The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins
-The King’s Stilts
-The Lorax (Spanish translation)
-The Sneetches and Other Stories
-“There’s a Wocket in My Pocket!”

The legacy of Dr. Seuss

Dr. Seuss is one of the most popular and beloved children’s authors of all time. His books have been entertaining and enlightening children for generations. However, recent years have seen a number of his books pulled from store shelves due to racially insensitive content.

The most notable example is “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street”, which was published in 1937. The book was pulled from a Massachusetts school district in 2017 after complaints that it contained racist imagery.

Other books that have been pulled include “If I Ran the Zoo” (1950), “The Cat’s Quizzer” (1976), and “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” (1990). While these books do not contain as much overtly racist content as “Mulberry Street”, they have been criticized for perpetuating harmful stereotypes about certain cultures and ethnicities.

It is important to remember that while Dr. Seuss’s books may contain offensive content, they are also products of their time. The author himself acknowledged this in an interview shortly before his death, saying that he would “try to make [his] books better” if he had the chance to do them over again.

The controversy surrounding Dr. Seuss

In recent years, six Dr. Seuss books have been pulled from publication due to their racist and offensive depictions of minority groups. The books in question are “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,” “If I Ran the Zoo,” “McElligot’s Pool,” “On Beyond Zebra!,” “Scrambled Eggs Super!” and “The Cat’s Quizzer.” These titles will no longer be printed or sold by Dr. Seuss Enterprises, the company that oversees the late author’s work.

This decision was made in response to growing criticism of Seuss’ work, which has been accused of perpetuating harmful stereotypes about minorities. While some fans are disappointed by the decision to pull the books from circulation, many believe it is a necessary step in combating racism.

The books that are being pulled from stores

Due to their racist and insensitive imagery, six Dr. Seuss books will no longer be published. These books are “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,” “If I Ran the Zoo,” “McElligot’s Pool,” “On Beyond Zebra!,” “Scrambled Eggs Super!” and “The Cat’s Quizzer.”

The reason for the pullback

In light of recent revelations about the author’s racist and sexist views, several of Dr Seuss’s books have been pulled from store shelves. Among the titles that are no longer being sold are ‘And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street’, ‘If I Ran the Zoo’, ‘McElligot’s Pool’, ‘On Beyond Zebra!’, and ‘Scrambled Eggs Super!’.

The reaction to the news

The news that six Dr Seuss books would no longer be printed due to racist and insensitive imagery has sparked a strong reaction online.

Many people have voiced their support for the decision, with some saying it was “about time” the books were pulled from shelves.

Others, however, have criticized the move, calling it “censorship” and arguing that children should be taught about racism, rather than shielded from it.

What this means for the future

In recent days, it was announced that six Dr. Seuss books would no longer be published due to their “racist and insensitive” imagery. The books in question are And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, If I Ran the Zoo, McElligot’s Pool, On Beyond Zebra!, Scrambled Eggs Super!, and The Cat’s Quizzer.

This decision has caused quite a stir, with many people coming to the defense of the beloved children’s author. While it is important to acknowledge the problematic nature of the imagery in these books, it is also worth considering the larger implications of this decision.

For one, this move signals a growing awareness of the need for diversity and inclusion in children’s literature. It is no longer acceptable to have books that feature only white, cisgender, able-bodied characters. This is a good thing! However, it is important to remember that Dr. Seuss was not writing for today’s audience. He was writing for the children of his time, who were used to seeing only white faces in books.

It is also worth considering the impact this decision will have on future generations of children. For many kids, Dr. Seuss is their first introduction to reading. His books are simple and fun, and they help kids fall in love with reading. by pulling his books from shelves, we run the risk of discouraging kids from picking up a book at all.

Of course, this decision is not without its criticisms. Some people argue that it represents “cancel culture” run amok, and that we should not be so quick to judge the past through today’s lens. Others argue that this move will simply lead to more censorship down the line.

Only time will tell what impact this decision will have on the world of children’s literature. For now, we can only hope that it will lead to a more inclusive and diverse world for our kids.

Scroll to Top